Kirkland_Eaton06

So, I bought this truck, and it had a few things wrong with it that I knew I could fix. Needed a new steering pump, needed new tires, a good fuel cleaning, and had an idling issue. Bought it for only $750 and thought nothing of the idling issue. In the morning, it would start and then want to die. I would be able to pump the gas until the check engine light would come on and the truck would not die. It would drive normally. I started replacing things including the Manifold Air Pressure Sensor, Throttle Position Sensor, and the Vacuum lines. Cleaned the Throttle Body and replaced the gasket as well. After doing this, I tried to drive the truck, and now, the check engine light won’t come on. Before replacing the Fuel Pressure Regulator, I wanted to take a look at the computer, and I think I found some issues.

 

My questions are: Can this be fixed? Is it worth being fixed? Should I just switch it to carbureted?

* Photos are in the attachment 

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John L.
You didn't mention if you got the code for the Check Engine Light.  Your code may be stored even though the light is not coming on.  Some place like Auto Zone might check it for free if you don't have access to a scan tool.  First, let me say that I am not an expert, but the one picture where it appeared that there should be solder definitely stood out to me.

I am actually dealing with a computer problem myself.  My PCM is a "special" one, so it is hard for me to get it fixed though I could not really find any place that is recommended to fix computers.  I found out that GM does fix stock PCMs, so you might want to check with a Ford dealer to see if they can fix it and what the cost would be.  Another option would be to buy a "new" computer which would need programmed.  A third option that might work is to find a computer in a junk yard for an F150 that is similar to yours and see if that fixes your problem.  I think checking into these things would give you an idea if it worth being fixed if the computer is definitely your problem.

Somebody else would probably be able to better answer your question about switching to a carburetor, but one thing to consider is what all is controlled by your computer.  Is your transmission controlled by the computer?  Do you have electric fans controlled by the computer?  Do you have A/C?  My guess is that you can't eliminate your computer and I am guessing that a carburetor would have to have a Throttle Position Sensor (if they even make that) to work.
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Kirkland_Eaton06
Unfortunately with the truck being older than 1996, I cannot get the computer read [frown]. I took the ECU to a local tech shop, they said that it can be repaired but at a high premium. I am pretty sure I am going to have to go with the option you mentioned. I am going to have to replace the computer. Once I do, I will update the post. Thank you very much for your input!!
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John L.
You are welcome!  I have a little more information for you if you are interested.  I am not positive about everything, so keep that in mind.  I think that the OBD2 protocol for the computer diagnostics port started in 1996 and vehicles before that with a computer had OBD1 which should be able to be read with a OBD1 scanner.  I think that I read somewhere that you could jump 2 pins in the OBD1 diagnostic port with something like a paper clip and the Check Engine Light would flash the trouble code sort of like Morse Code.
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cosmicfrog
Fuel injection is vastly superior to carbureted. A lot of folks are swapping carburetion for EFI. Either you have a vacuum leak or there
s something wrong inside. Before you toss more parts at it, do a little trouble shooting. Get a clean empty spray bottle and while the engine is running, use it to spray water around the base of the throttle body and where the intake meets the block. If you have a vacuum leak, the engine speed may change for a moment. You also want to get a vacuum gauge. not a little one you mount on the dash, unless you like those. I mean the large mechanics type. I think you can borrow them at auto parts places like AutoZone, Advance and so on. A healthy engine should pull about 15-17 inches of vacuum at idle when warmed up. If it's low, you may have a leak or your timing is off. If it flutters, you might have a valve train problem or a burnt valve.

Two tools any mechanic needs are a vacuum gauge and a volt/ohm meter. Even with computers, the old trouble shooting methods still work. Computers just makke some jobs quicker.
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Kirkland_Eaton06
Thanks! Unfortunately, the engine won't idle. It used to be unable to drive it until the check engine light would come on and could idle and drive well, but now, the check engine light won't come on. I can't idle. What happens is it will start, run for a moment, act like it's flooding, and dies.
Update: I checked in with my local computer shop, and they said a few of the conponents were bad making it malfunction. Once I get a little money saved up, I will go to a junkyard and find another computer. Keep y'all updated.
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cosmicfrog
First and foremost, what engine, transmission do you have along with how many miles on the truck? Fords with OBD I are miserable to pull codes from. At least the brain box isn't as vehicle specific as the OBD II ones. If you have a lot of miles, it may have jumped time. In that case, you have to replace the timing set. Now you know why you got the truck so cheap.

I've gotten many cars and trucks over the years and spent a little time and money fixing them up. I drove one truck for nearly 20 years and it like to killed me when I had to junk it. Another 2000 miles and it would have hit 400K. It still drove and ran good, but the tin worms got to it. When the frame breaks in half, it's still fixable but wasn't worth the bother to me. 
Honk if you love Jesus.
Text if you want to meet him.
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